Property Tax Savings

FAQs- Frequently asked Questions about Oregon Property Tax Appeals

By Prime PTN • October 26, 2011 • Filed in: FAQs, News, Property Tax Guru

Over the next few weeks Oregon’s Property Tax Appeal Campaign will kick off in earnest.  Prime PTN hopes to demystify the property tax appeal process by listing the most frequently asked questions and their answers.  We’ll have several installments.  We take a client centric approach…feel free to contact us directly with questions at: info@primeptn.com.

Questions and Answers

1. Is it really possible to get a property tax refund in Oregon?

YES! This is perhaps the most pervasive myth that Prime PTN hears nearly everyday. We’ve had many successes for the most recent appeal season…and past seasons as well. Refunds have ranged from thousands to tens of thousand of dollars.

2. Does it cost a lot of money upfront?

NO. We evaluate your case for free. Professional fees are on a contingency basis only…If we don’t win we don’t get paid.  We do ask clients to pay filing fees, but relative to the potential tax savings they’re comparatively small.

3. Do I always have to get and pay for an appraisal to win?

NO. To be successful at property tax appeals requires valuation skill and exceptional legal acumen. Most firms have one or the other.  We pride ourselves on having both.  Most of the cases we have won have been without appraisals.  If they are available we would want to have them.  If they’re not…then we would rather work a bit harder and give our clients a higher return.  We would tell you if an appraisal was required and get your approval before spending money.

4. The County Appraiser told me in order to get a property tax refund, I had to prove that the Market Value was lower than the Appraised Value. True?

NO. Compression refunds often start well above the Assessed Value. Prime PTN has a proprietary program that calculates where refunds start and how much might be possible. This is only an estimate…the actual refund (if any) will be determined by the court’s judgement based on the evidence both sides offer and applicable statutes and case law.

 

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